Diocese of Steubenville

Contact Info

422 Washington Street
P.O. Box 969
Steubenville, OH 43952
P: 740-282-3631
F: 740-282-3327

Diocese of Steubenville

WHAT WE DO

Diocese of Steubenville Official Website

Bishop Monfonton's Ordinary Time Message 2015

The Diocese of Steubenville is an ecclesiastical division of the Church governed and administered by a bishop who is subject to the ultimate authority of the Holy Father. The Diocese is the local Church, the People of God, all of whom assist the Bishop in the administration of the Diocese. A diocese usually receives its name from the See City and ordinarily the Bishop resides in that city. 
The Diocese of Steubenville comprises thirteen counties in Eastern Ohio. They are Athens, Belmont, Carroll, Gallia, Guernsey, Harrison, Jefferson, Lawrence, Meigs, Morgan, Monroe, Noble and Washington. This territory comprises 5,913 square miles with a total population of 508,406 according to the 2012 federal census estimates. The Catholic Diocese of Steubenville was established on October 21, 1944 and the Most Reverend John King Mussio was appointed the first Bishop on March 16, 1945. The Catholic population is approximately 35,603.

Holy Name Cathedral "Renovation Restoration Renewal"

Online Giving

 

Thank you for supporting the Diocesan Parish Share Campaign, Holy Name Cathedral Renovation or the Immaculate Heart Fund. 

Contact Us

Diocese of Steubenville
422 Washington Street
P.O. Box 969
Steubenville, Ohio 43952
Phone 740-282-3631
Fax 740-282-3327

Publications


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Bishop Monforton's Twitter Feed

@BishopMonforton: "Beloved, rejoice in the measure that you share Christ’s sufferings." (1 Peter 4). We all are united in the suffering and death of Jesus.

"Beloved, rejoice in the measure that you share Christ’s sufferings." (1 Peter 4). We all are united in the suffering and death of Jesus.

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@BishopMonforton: "Truth can be assaulted but never defeated." (Saint Boniface) May we increase our resolve to teach the sanctity of marriage. Never despair.

"Truth can be assaulted but never defeated." (Saint Boniface) May we increase our resolve to teach the sanctity of marriage. Never despair.

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@BishopMonforton: On this, my 21st anniversary of presbyteral ordination, I give thanks to God to be able to share the Eucharist with my brothers and sisters.

On this, my 21st anniversary of presbyteral ordination, I give thanks to God to be able to share the Eucharist with my brothers and sisters.

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Vatican News Feed

Pope Francis: Changes to summer agenda

(Vatican Radio) The General Audiences held on Wednesdays will be suspended for the whole month of July. They will resume in August in the Paul VI Hall.

There will, however, be an Audience on the afternoon of July 3rd with the Movement of Renewal in the Spirit, in St. Peter's Square.

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Pope Francis greets Benedict XVI before summer break

(Vatican Radio) Pope Francis on Tuesday morning visited Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI at his residence, the former Convent Mater Ecclesiae, in the Vatican, to greet him and wish him a pleasant stay in Castel Gandolfo in the Roman hills. The meeting lasted about half and hour.

The director of the Vatican Press Office, Father Federico Lombardi said the Pope Emeritus transferred to the summer retreat earlier today and will remain there for the next two weeks. He is scheduled to return  on July 14. 

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Pope Francis: Christians and Jews, brothers and friends

(Vatican Radio) This week members of the International Council of Christians and Jews have been meeting to discuss “The 50th Anniversary of Nostra Aetate: The Past, Present, and Future of the Christian-Jewish Relationship”, and it was on this theme that Pope Francis addressed the participants on Tuesday in the Clementine Hall in the Vatican.

He told them that Nostra Aetate represented a definitive “yes” to the Jewish roots of Christianity and an irrevocable “no” to anti-Semitism adding, that both faith traditions were no longer strangers, but friends and brothers.

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